Kerecis to Present Fish-Skin Research at Military Health System Research Symposium

U.S. military health providers will learn about use of fish skin to treat combat wounds and in brain surgery

Kissimmee, Florida – August 29, 2017 – Kerecis will present key findings of research into fish-skin treatments for the care of severely wounded service members during the 2017 Military Health System Research Symposium. The research was funded by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) and the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command.

The goal of the research is to establish the efficacy of the Kerecis Omega3-rich fish skin to cover limbs injured or lost by explosives, and for dura repair after head trauma. The fish skin will be used to cover limb injuries from the time the medic first treats the service member until the patient is in a full-service hospital and after debridement as a skin-graft substitute. The dura-repair fish-skin technology will be used in a combat hospital setting where severe head traumas are treated.

The need for improved remedies for severe wounds and head trauma has intensified with the increased amount of insurgent warfare. Head traumas and death rates related to burn and blast injuries in such warfare are higher than in conventional battlefield conditions, partially because of the extensive use of improvised explosive devices.

The Kerecis Omega3 fish skin is already FDA approved for treating burns and other wounds. “The trial results presented on the conference literally put our fish-skin-based technology on the ‘front line’ for treating more serious trauma and will help us expand our regulatory approvals at the FDA to new indications. Kerecis is committed to developing better remedies for injured U.S. service members, and to providing good research value for the DoD,” explained G. Fertram Sigurjonsson, CEO, Kerecis.

About Kerecis Omega3 in the Treatment of Wounds

“Cadaver skin has been the preferred initial treatment for severe burns,“ explained Dr. Hilmar Kjartansson, Medical Director at Kerecis. “It is commonly used in hospitals, where skin grafting is the preferred way to treat stabilized burn wounds. However, on the battlefield or in other combat conditions, it’s not practical to use cadaver skin or skin grafts.”

The research capitalizes on the characteristics of the FDA-approved Kerecis Omega3 Wound product, intact fish skin that is rich in naturally occurring Omega3 polyunsaturated fatty acids.

About Kerecis Omega3 in the Treatment of Head Trauma

“The dural membrane surrounds the brain and contains the brain fluids,” explained Dr. Kjartansson. “In severe head trauma the dural membrane is damaged and needs to be restored to contain the brain fluids. At the conference we will present the results of a large animal trial where the efficacy of the Kerecis Omega3-rich fish skin is established as a dura patch.”

Research Presentations

Tuesday, August 29, 2017, at 15:30, in the TBI Treatment & Emerging Care breakout session, Dr. Ingvar Olafsson will present the results of a large ovine study where Kerecis Omega3 fish skin was used successfully to treat dural defects. The results show minimal inflammatory response, good tissue integration and neodura formation. Dr. Olafsson is a neurosurgeon at Landspitali University Hospital in Iceland.

Wednesday, August 30, 2017, at 08:30, in plenary session A, Lt. Col. SLA Jeffery, RAMC, will present results of a comparative burn study where fish skin and cadaver skin were compared in a porcine model. Lt. Col. SLA Jeffery is a burns and plastic surgeon consultant at the Royal Centre for Defence Medicine, The Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham, UK.

About the Military Health System Research Symposium

The MHSRS, the Department of Defense’s premier scientific meeting, is a venue for communicating and discussing new scientific knowledge resulting from military-unique research and development. The annual event is the only military or civilian meeting that focuses specifically on the unique medical needs of the Warfighter. MHSRS is sponsored by the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs.

U.S. Office of Naval Research Global Features Kerecis Fish-Skin Technology for Combat Injuries

The ONR Global annual report has highlighted a U.S. Navy grant to Kerecis.

Arlington, Virginia – August 14, 2017 – The U.S. Office of Naval Research Global 2016 Annual Report has highlighted a U.S. Navy grant to Kerecis to develop a fish-skin solution for the acute care of severely injured limbs.

The goal of the grant is to expand the use of Kerecis FDA-approved technology for the use of temporarily covering of limbs injured or lost by explosives. Specifically, the fish skin will be used from the time of injury until the patient is in a full-service hospital. A shift in the nature of injuries from a traditional battlefield pattern to fighting against insurgents who use improvised explosive devices has brought these types of injuries to the forefront of care for injured servicemen and women. The death rate and seriousness of wounds in insurgent warfare are higher than in battlefield conditions.

Cadaver skin has been the preferred initial treatment for severe burns and is frequently used in the hospital setting. Skin grafting is the doctor's preferred way to treat stabilized burn wounds. In battlefield and other austere environments, however, neither cadaver skin nor skin grafting is practical.

“Kerecis is committed to developing better remedies for injured U.S. service members,” explains G. Fertram Sigurjonsson, the company’s CEO.  “This partnership allows us to modify and test our existing FDA-approved fish-skin technology as a potential alternative to cadaver skin and grafts in burn injuries in animal models and in a small human clinical study.”

“In an interconnected world, where knowledge has no borders, ONR Global is essential to our mission of delivering decisive new capabilities to naval forces,” writes Chief of Naval Research Rear Admiral David J. Hahn in the report’s opening pages.  “Forging partnerships around the world brings invaluable insights to our research efforts, and maximizes resources by leveraging ongoing programs in partner nations.”


About ONR Global

ONR Global acts as a two-way bridge from the U.S. naval fleet and U.S. Marine Corps Forces, the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations, the international science and technology community, and foreign military partners to ONR to the Naval Research Enterprise and other Department of Defense and government agencies.  From basic research to technology transition, ONR Global supports the Department of the Navy’s full spectrum of Research, Development, Test and Evaluation through its Science Advisor, International Science, and International Liaison Offices. ONR Global advances the discovery and delivery elements of ONR’s mission.
ONR Global is online at https://www.onr.navy.mil/Science-Technology/ONR-Global.

How Fish Skin Is Transforming Healthcare

Bloomberg Businessweek features Kerecis Omega3 Wound fish-skin technology on its front page

Arlington, Virginia — June 28, 2017 — Bloomberg Businessweek featured Kerecis Omega3 Wound fish-skin technology in its lead article "Fish Skin for Human Wounds: Iceland’s Pioneering Treatment” and an accompanying video, “How Fish Skin is Transforming Health Care.”

The five-minute film leads with Kerecis founder and CEO Fertram Sigurjonsson at the Kerecis processing facility in Isafjordur in northwest Iceland, where Kerecis was founded. It goes on to interview Director of Manufacturing Brian Lynn Thomas and provides stunning footage of the region and fishing in the pristine waters that surround it.

“Bloomberg has captured elegantly how the fish-skin technology of Kerecis stands to save the limbs and lives of countless patients around the globe,” says Sigurjonsson. “We seek to put our products into the hands of medical professionals everywhere as they treat patients who suffer from severe, life-threatening wounds.”

Skin grafting is the doctor’s preferred treatment for wounds. In such situations skin from a healthy part of the body is moved to the wound. This process is only used as a last resort, however, because using the patient´s own skin creates an undesirable secondary wound.

The virtual absence of risk in transmitting viral disease from cold-water fish skin to humans allows for it to be processed gently. This preserves the structure and content of fish-skin grafts, which has relevance in wound-closure rates, as shown in a recent randomized controlled study in which wounds treated with fish skin closed significantly faster than wounds treated with pig tissue.

Skin from livestock is not an ideal substitute for the patient’s skin because heavy processing is needed to eliminate risk of disease transmission. This harsh, anti-viral treatment removes most of the material’s natural components making it dissimilar to human skin.

The company’s products are available in the United States, Iceland, Germany, and several other European and Asian countries. Specifically, the product has been approved by European regulatory authorities and the FDA and is eligible for reimbursement by Medicare in the U.S. The fish skin used in Kerecis’s products derives from wild and sustainable fish stock caught in pristine Icelandic waters and is processed with 100% renewable energy in Isafjordur.

Kerecis is online at kerecis.com, on LinkedIn, and Facebook.

Kerecis Fish-Skin Technology Named One of the Top Ten Innovations in Podiatry

Podiatry Today includes Kerecis Omega3 Wound in ranking new technologies

Arlington, Virginia – July 25, 2017Podiatry Today has named the Kerecis™ Omega3 Wound fish-skin graft as one of the top 10 innovations in podiatry. The product is the only fish-skin-based therapeutic product available globally.

Kerecis Omega3 is intact fish skin that is rich in naturally occurring Omega3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. When grafted onto damaged human tissue such as a wound, the material provides a template for cellular ingrowth that facilitates healing and regeneration.

Absence of disease transmission risk allows the Kerecis fish skin to be processed in a gentle manner preserving structure and content. The result is that Kerecis Omega3 is more similar to human skin than any other product available today. This has relevance in wound closure as shown by multiple clinical trials, including a double-blind, comparative, randomized control trial (N=162) where fish skin favorably compared with pig-derived skin substitutes.

In the article, Dr. Lee C. Rogers, DPM, notes that the Kerecis product maintains the native tissue structure and cross-linking, and also contains Omega3 fatty acids, a potent anti-inflammatory. “Since chronic wounds may be stuck in the inflammatory phase of healing, a graft which reduces inflammation has tremendous potential,” said Dr. Rogers, who is medical director of the Amputation Prevention Centers of America and clinical assistant professor at the Western University of Health Sciences College of Podiatric Medicine.

“We are honored by this recognition from Podiatry Today, and would like to acknowledge the many podiatrists who have used our product to treat wounds safely, thoroughly and cost-effectively,” said G. Fertram Sigurjonsson, founder and CEO of Kerecis.

The Kerecis products are now available in the United States, Iceland, Germany, and several other European and Asian countries. Specifically, the product has been approved by the FDA and European regulatory authorities, and is eligible for reimbursement by Medicare in the United States. 

The fish skin used in Kerecis products comes from wild and sustainable fish stock caught in pristine Icelandic waters and processed with 100% renewable energy in a township at the polar circle.

About Podiatry Today

Podiatry Today is an award-winning, premier publication that emphasizes informative clinical features and columns as well as practice management articles. It can be found online at podiatrytoday.com.

 

Fish Skin Company Kerecis Named Iceland’s Fastest Growing Startup
 
Company that uses fish skin to heal human wounds and tissue damage is one of Europe’s fastest growing companies

Reykjavik, Iceland -- May 30, 2017 -- The Icelandic Growth Consortium has named Kerecis the country’s fastest growing startup. Kerecis is the creator, manufacturer and patent holder of revolutionary fish-skin-based therapeutic products that speed up the healing process of chronic human wounds and repair tissue damage.

The award acknowledges that Kerecis showed the fastest revenue growth year-to-year compared to the other nominated startups. It confirms that Kerecis spends more than 20 percent of its revenue on research and development activities, and that its founders still retain a significant stake in the company.

"This award recognizes the financial milestones we have reached in the past year, as the efficacy of our fish-skin-based products becomes more well-known, and as the products themselves become more available worldwide," said G. Fertram Sigurjonsson, founder and CEO of Kerecis.

The company’s products are now available in the United States, Iceland, Germany, and several other European and Asian countries. Specifically, the product has been approved by the FDA and European regulatory authorities and is eligible for reimbursement by Medicare in the U.S.

Kerecis Omega3 is intact fish skin that is rich in naturally occurring Omega3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. When grafted onto damaged human tissue such as a diabetic wound, the acellular material recruits the body’s cells from the wound perimeter. The cells are then incorporated into the fish skin, which is ultimately converted into functional, living tissue. Research has shown that the patented material helps heal chronic and hard-to-heal wounds, including diabetic, venous, foot and pressure ulcers.

The fish skin used in Kerecis’s products derives from wild and sustainable fish stock caught in pristine Icelandic waters and processed with 100% renewable energy in a township at the polar circle.
 
About the Icelandic Growth Consortium

The Icelandic Growth Consortium consists of the Federation of Icelandic Industries, Iceland Startups, the University of Reykjavik and the Icelandic Research Institute.